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peppered meaning

    pepper | meaning of pepper in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary

    pepper meaning, definition, what is pepper: a powder that is used to add a hot taste: Learn more.

    peppered - Meaning in hindi - Shabdkosh

    Definitions and Meaning of pepper in English. noun. sweet and hot varieties of fruits of plants of the genus Capsicum; pungent seasoning from the berry of the 

    Pepper spray: Effects, treatment, and compliions

    25 Sep 2018 Pepper spray is a lachrymatory agent, meaning that it stimulates the eyes to produce tears. An oil known as oleoresin capsicum is the main 

    What do English native speakers mean by 'salt and pepper'

    2 Nov 2016 “Salt and pepper” has a number of figurative senses too, but even native English speakers don't necessarily know them:—. It could mean 

    Peppered Synonyms, Peppered Antonyms | Thesaurus.com

    Synonyms for peppered at Thesaurus.com with free online thesaurus, antonyms, and peppered. [ pep-er ]. SEE DEFINITION OF peppered. as inspeckled; as 

    Pepper definition and meaning | Collins English Dictionary

    Pepper definition: Pepper is a hot-tasting spice which is used to flavour food. | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples.

    peppered - definition and meaning - Wordnik

    from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License. adjective Seasoned with pepper . adjective Speckled . verb Simple past tense and past 

    Peppered - Urban Dictionary

    Peppered, a word used to describe action of someone getting hit multiple times, it can also be used to describe the severity of someone getting roasted.

    pepper | Origin and meaning of pepper by Online Etymology

    PEPPER Meaning: "dried berries of the pepper plant," Middle English peper, from Old English pipor, from an early West See definitions of pepper.

    pepper 在英语中的意思 - Cambridge Dictionary

    2020年5月6日 pepper的意思、解释及翻译:1. a grey or white powder produced by crushing dry peppercorns, used to give a spicy, hot taste to。了解更多。

    Pepper | Meaning of Pepper by Lexico

    What does pepper mean? pepper is defined by the lexicographers at Oxford Dictionaries as A pungent hot-tasting powder prepared from dried and ground 

    Pepper With | Definition of Pepper With by Merriam-Webster

    Pepper with definition is - to hit (someone) repeatedly with (something) —often used figuratively. How to use pepper with in a sentence.

    Pepper definition and meaning | Collins English Dictionary

    Pepper definition: Pepper is a hot-tasting spice which is used to flavour food. | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples.

    What is Pepper? Definition of Pepper, Pepper Meaning - The

    Definition: Pepper or black pepper is the dried unripe fruit grown in the plant called piper nigrum. It's pungent smell, peppery/hot taste and health friendly 

    Black pepper - Wikipedia

    In the 16th century, people began using pepper to also mean the unrelated New World chili pepper (genus Capsicum). Varieties[edit]. Six variants of peppercorns ( 

    pepper Urdu Meanings - Urdu2Eng

    1) pepper. Noun. Climber having dark red berries (peppercorns) when fully ripe; southern India and Sri Lanka; naturalized in northern Burma and Assam.

    Peppered - definition of peppered by The Free Dictionary

    Define peppered. peppered synonyms, peppered pronunciation, peppered translation, English dictionary definition of peppered. n. 1. a. A perennial climbing  

    Peppered | Definition of Peppered at Dictionary.com

    Peppered definition, a pungent condiment obtained from various plants of the genus Piper, especially from the dried berries, used whole or ground, of the 

    Pepper - Definition for English-Language Learners from Merriam

    Definition of pepper written for English Language Learners from the Merriam- Webster Learner's Dictionary with audio pronunciations, usage examples, and 

    peppered - Wiktionary

    EnglishEdit. AdjectiveEdit. peppered (comparative more peppered, superlative most peppered). Seasoned with pepper. quotations ▽. 2001, Clifford A. Wright,